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E-Term 2024

 

Welcome to Exploration Term 2024

The projects offered during Exploration Term may vary in content and technique, but they all share the goal of providing an opportunity for exploration not possible during the regular term. This includes opportunities for undergraduate research-focused creative production. Faculty-led projects, sophomore, junior, and senior students are encouraged to use initiative and imagination to develop their own contracted projects through the Krulak Institute.

Under the Explorations curriculum, students must pass at least two E-Term projects as part of their general education requirements. Each project counts as a full unit. Whether graded with a letter or S/U, all projects count toward the requirement of two E-Term units. A transfer student who meets only the minimum residency requirements for a degree must pass two E-Term projects.

All E-Term projects are recorded on permanent records and class schedules according to discipline abbreviations (including “GEN” for those projects outside of the disciplines offered at the College). If required for the major, senior E-Term projects will be recorded as 499.

E-Term projects cannot be used to fulfill the academic areas required under the Explorations curriculum; however, they may be used to fulfill the Experiential Learning (EL) requirement in Explorations. Projects used to fulfill the EL requirement in Explorations may receive either a letter grade or S/U

Questions about E-Term?

Contact Kristin Harper, Director of E-Term and Study Travel 
Norton 263 | (205) 226-4720 | [email protected] 
Krulak Institute for Leadership, Civic Engagement, and Experiential Learning
 

 

Important Information

  •  

    Important Dates

    Important Dates

     

    Friday, September 8

    Travel Award Application Deadline

    Thursday, September 28

    First-year Bootcamp session on E-Term registration

    Tuesday, October 10 & Wednesday, October 11

    E-Term Registration for first-year students

    Tuesday, October 24 – Wednesday, November 1

    E-Term Registration for seniors, juniors, and sophomores

    Wednesday, November 8

    E-Term contracts due in the Krulak Institute (form in Engage)

    Thursday, November 16

    All Projects meet @ 11 am

    Wednesday, January 3

    First day of E-Term

    Friday, January 5

    Last day to drop without a grade or to add an E-Term project

    Monday, January 15

    Martin Luther King, Jr Holiday (no classes)

    Tuesday, January 16

    Last day to drop a project with a grade of “W”

    Wednesday, January 31

    Last day of E-Term

    Thursday, February 1 – Monday, February 5

    Winter Break

    Thursday, February 1 - Friday, February 2

    Sophomore Summit

    Friday, February 9

    Professors report E-Term grades

    Monday, February 12

    Grades available on Self-Service

     

  •  

    How to Register for E-Term

    Students are expected to register for only one E-Term project during the month of January and to be involved with that project for at least 9,000 minutes (or 150 clock hours) for the term. 

    First-Year students will attend a First-Year Bootcamp session on preparing for E-Term registration on September 28 and will register October 10-11 on Self Service. 
    E-Term registration for seniors, juniors, and sophomores is at the same time as registration for spring classes - October 24  November 1, 2023, on Self Service. 
    Prior to E-Term registration, see your advisor to discuss E-Term projects and spring term classes.  E-Term registration times and instructions will be provided by Academic Records in the weeks prior to registration.
  •  

    Internships

    Students may intern over E-Term for a minimum of 30 hours per week. Students interested in pursuing an internship for E-Term should start planning early and are encouraged to meet with Katie Robinson ([email protected]),Director of Internships, for assistance and guidance. Students should begin by logging into Handshake (bsc.joinhandshake.com) to book a planning appointment, review résumé resources, and search for opportunities.    

    Additionally, students who wish to pursue pre-law or pre-health internships should contact the appropriate advisor to express their interest.

     

    Students who wish to complete internships in Accounting; Business; Community & Social Change (religion/nonprofit internships); Pre-Health; Pre-Law; Public History; or Student Teaching may register for the corresponding project listing found in this bulletin. Students wishing to complete internships outside of these areas should complete an Independent Study Contract.

  •  

    Independent Study Contracts

    Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who wish to engage in independent study for E-Term may do so through an independent study contract. Independent study projects may include student-designed service-learning projects, research projects, travel, or internships. Any student wishing to pursue independent study should work in close consultation with a faculty sponsor to develop a contract using the worksheet found on the Krulak Institute Forms page on the 365英国上市官网 website – http://bjtvtv.mikeshiner.com/academics/krulak/Forms.html.   When you are ready to submit your contract for review, you can find the contract form on Engage. After contracts are reviewed, the Contract Learning Committee notifies the student of any changes required for the contract to receive approval and be registered. If the contract is not approved, the student has the option to instead register for an E-Term project published in the bulletin.   

    Independent study contracts should meet the academic standards of all E-Term projects. The student is expected to engage in 9,000 minutes (150 clock hours) of focused academic activity and to meet the terms of the study contract: follow the project’s methodology as stated in the contract, attend all required meetings with the faculty sponsor, and submit the final academic product as indicated in the contract.  The deadline for independent study contracts for E-Term 2023 is Wednesday, November 8, 2023.  

    All contracts that include activities off campus also require a release form.  Students engaged in contracts for E-Term 2024 will be registered by the Krulak Institute once their contracts have been reviewed and approved by the Contract Learning faculty committee.

  •  

    Senior E-Term Projects

    Many academic disciplines require students to complete a senior E-Term project in their major. This project is usually carried out in the senior year, but occasionally students are given permission to complete the senior project in their junior year.

    Students may either register for an E-Term senior project offered in their major (AC, AR, BA, BI, ED, HS, MA, MU, and THA majors only), or they may contract an independent senior project to fulfill this requirement.

  •  

    Requirements for off-campus study & travel

    Any student traveling off campus for a credit-bearing experience during E-Term must complete and sign a release form. For students under 19 years of age, a parent or guardian must sign the release. Release forms are located on Krulak Institute Forms page on the 365英国上市官网 website - http://bjtvtv.mikeshiner.com/academics/krulak/Forms.html 

    In order to participate in study-travel, students must:

    1. Be in good academic and social standing at the College.
    2. Submit all required paperwork (financial agreement, release form, proof of passport) to the Krulak Institute (Norton 260).

     

    Since study-travel is in effect an extension of the physical campus, students studying off campus are required to conform to 365英国上市官网’s academic and social regulations and policies as if they were in the classroom or on the campus. 365英国上市官网 requires all students to conform to both US and local laws, including those pertaining to the use of alcohol, controlled substances, prescription medication, interpersonal interactions, public health measures, and public behavior. 

    Faculty leading study-travel projects may establish additional policies of academic and social conduct to which students consent when they register for the project. Failure to comply with either 365英国上市官网’s general policies or the policies established by the faculty leading the project can result in disciplinary action and/or a failing grade for the project. In extreme circumstances—should the student endanger him or herself or others or threaten the integrity of the project—and at the discretion of the project’s faculty leader, the student may be sent home at his or her own expense. 

    Study-travel projects led by faculty require a commitment early in fall term. Check with your faculty leader for details. If an insufficient number of students express interest in any study-travel project, the College will cancel it on or before Monday, October 2. Students who elect to withdraw from a study-travel project are not guaranteed a refund of any monies submitted toward the project.

    NOTE: It is possible that some projects may still have available spots after October 2; however, students run the risk of the project being canceled or full if they wait until then to commit.

Exploration Term Projects

E-Term projects are subject to change without notice.  Please contact the Krulak Institute or speak to your advisor for the most up-to-date project list.

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    First-Year Projects

    Project Number

    Title

    Instructor(s)

    BA*299*1

    Moving Up the Food Chain: Vertical Integration in European Agri-business Firms

    Bert Morrow and Sara Robicheaux

    EH*299*56

    Reading and Writing Detective Fiction

    Michael McInturff

    GEN*299*3

    Education in Belize

    Amelia Spencer and Ann Dominick

    GEN*299*5

    The ABCs of European Capitals: Art, Business, and Culture of 5 European Cities (Madrid, Athens, Paris, Vienna, Brussels)

    Rick Lester and Treva Lester

    ARH*299*12

    The Real Thing: Exploring Art in Birmingham and Area Museums

    Kathleen Spies

    BI*299*15

    Humans, Infectious Diseases, and Public Health

    Sarah Faxel

    BST*299*17

    Between the Barber Shops and the Churches: An Exploration of Birmingham’s Black Cultural Spaces
    Next Generation Nutritional Supplements

    Marlon A. Smith

    CH*299*18

    Next Generation Nutritional Supplements

    Scott C. Dorman

    CHN*299*19

    An Exploration of Cultural Perspectives on Individual and Collective Rights during the Covid-19 Health Crisis in China

    Yan Tong

    ED*299*20

    Explorations in Teaching in Elementary Schools

    STAFF

    ED*299*21

    Explorations in Teaching in Middle and High Schools

    Louanne Jacobs

    EH*299*23

    Tolkien’s Worlds: Language, History, Myth, Story

    Jody Stitt

    GEN*299*24

    A Look at Drones - Exploring Aerial Navigation

    Anthony Winchester

    GEN*299*25

    Changing Hobbies to Hustles: The Art of Stock Investments

    Sylvester Makoko

    GEN*299*26

    Comic of Your Story

    Elena Masrour

    GEN*299*27

    Civil War, Fascism, and the New Spain

    Eduardo Gregori

    GEN*299*28

    Criminal Law - An Overview

    Jack Taylor

    GEN*299*29

    Embroidery Fundamentals

    Elaine Kinnaird

    GEN*299*30

    Fantasy Football: A Case Study in Applied Data Analytics

    Walter Turner

    GEN*299*31

    How to Rest: Sabbath as Resistance and Renewal

    Kelsey Grissom

    GEN*299*33

    Intersectional Exploration of Womanhood Embodiment

    Chénoia Bryant

    GEN*299*34

    Introducation to Fresco and Scraffito

    Jurgen Tarrasch

    GEN*299*35

    January Wellness: Learning Ashtanga Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, Meditation, and Best Nutrition Practices

    Mary Harrison

    GEN*299*36

    Music’s Role in the Black Freedom Struggle in the United States from 1865 to 1965

    Joanna Pepple

    GEN*299*38

    Public Speaking and Social Advocacy

    Yingling Liu

    GEN*299*39

    Speculative Fiction Book Club, Film Salon, and Futurist Society

    Randy Cragun

    GEN*299*40

    The Science of Cooking

    Duane Pontius

    GEN*299*54

    Fooling the Eye: The Art of Tromp L’oeil, Faux and Scenic Painting

    Matthew Mielke

    HI*299*41

    Conspiracies and Secret Societies

    Elyssa Gage

    MU*299*45

    Children’s Opera

    Jeff Kensmoe

    MU*299*47

    The Roots of Rock & Roll

    Lester Seigel

    PS*299*49

    The Presidential Nominating System

    Steve Borrelli

    PY*299*52

    Sport and Exercise Psychology

    Richard Rector

    THA*299*53

    Hamilton: Representation, Then and Now

    Jennifer Luck

    UES*299*55

    Investigations of fish populations comparing coastal and montane habitats in the SE United States

    Mark Meade

     

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    Accounting

    AC*499*10
    Senior Project in Accounting
    Tracy Smith 

    Open To:                                   Senior Accounting Majors
    Prerequisites:                            AC 322, AC 324, AC 421
    Class Days:                               M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                              8:00 am - 5:00 pm or hours approved
                                                      by employer and Dr. Smith
    Grading:                                    Letter Grade

     

    The Senior Project in accounting is an experience designed to solidify and enhance students’ knowledge in the accounting field.  The experience may include a ten-week internship or an in-class project.  Topics may include recent accounting developments, extensions of accounting concepts, and exploring basic business systems.  Those students electing an internship for their senior project should consult with the disciplinary faculty about the variety of internship options. 

    Estimated Student Fees:           $250
    Distinctions/Designations:     Experiential Learning

     
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    Art

    AR*499*11
    Independent art studio projects
    Kevin Shook

    Open To:                                 Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors who have completed two 300 level art courses.
    Consent Required:                    No
    Prerequisites:                          Two completed 300 level art studio courses or consent
    Class Days:                              M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                             9:00 am to 4:00 pm
    Grading:                                  Option 

     

    AR 499 is the second component of the Senior Capstone experience for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in studio art. BFA candidates will have completed the approved contract proposed at the end of AR 471. AR 499 emphasizes current themes in contemporary art and portfolio development. BFA students will select themes as they relate to the individual and their portfolio as the student focuses on the production and refinement of a cohesive portfolio in preparation for the BFA exhibition, students are required to work outside of class to fulfill a minimum 40-hour workweek.

    Estimated Fees:                   None
    Designations:                      None 

     

  •  

    Art History

    ARH*299*12
    The Real Thing: Exploring Art in Birmingham and Area Museums
    Kathleen Spies

    Open To:                                All Students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                           1:00 pm to 3:00 pm; additional time for two out-of-town day trips
    Grading:                                 Option

     

    This project will help students learn about art and art history through an examination of “the real thing,” that is, actual paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints rather than reproductions in a textbook or classroom. Class periods will be held at the Birmingham Museum of Art, with day trips to the Montgomery Museum of Art and the High Museum in Atlanta. Movements, periods, and geographical regions discussed will be of a wide range, with special attention to the art of Europe, the United States, Asia, and Africa. In addition to studying the history of art, we will take a critical look at the aura historically attached to the real object versus the reproduction. We will explore how exhibition practices affect the meaning of art and how scholars and artists recently have been challenging them. Class meetings will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations.

    Estimated Fees:               None
    Designations:                  None

     
  •  

    Biology

    BI*299*15
    Humans, Infectious Diseases, and Public Health
    Sarah Faxel

    Open To:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M T W Th 
    Class Hours:                           9:00 am - 12:00 pm  
    Grading:                                Option 

     

    Interested in understanding the origins, spread, and responses to infectious diseases? Wondering if “The Last of Us” could really happen? Join as we discuss infectious disease origins and pandemics, from tuberculosis and malaria to Ebola, HIV/AIDS, and COVID-19. Using readings from popular media and science journals, documentaries, games, and activities, we will explore the history of infectious diseases, where they come from, and how we deal with them. Topics will include vaccines, neglected tropical diseases, evolution of viruses, antimicrobial resistance, and the role of public health organizations such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this project, students will be evaluated based on attendance, out- of-class reading, participation in discussions, quizzes, and an in-class 15-minute presentation on an infectious disease of choice. We will watch the first episode of “The Last of Us” and discuss it. This project will include trips to UAB’s 1917 HIV clinic and to the CDC in Atlanta, GA. This project is open to all students; no previous college science classes required.

    Estimated Student Fees:         $10.00
    Designations:                         Public Health Studies

    BI*499*16
    Capstone Seminar in Biology
    Jason Heaton

    Open to:                               Senior Biology Majors
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        Completion of a research-intensive course or independent research experience
    Class Days:                           M Tu W Th
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    This culminating seminar for the biology major serves as the second half of the capstone experience and focuses on current research topics and literature in biology. Each student will lead an hour-long discussion on a scientific article relevant to their senior research project. Students will also develop and present a polished 15-minute seminar focused on their previously conducted capstone research project. To demonstrate mastery of the core concepts of biology, students will complete the senior biology exam.

    Estimated Fees:               None
    Designations:                 None

     
  •  

    Black Studies

    BST*299*17
    Between the Barber Shops and the Churches: An Exploration of Birmingham's Black Cultural Spaces
    Marlon A. Smith

    Open to:                                All students
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Sa
    Class Hours:                           10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    The historical role and cultural significance that Black churches, barbershops, and beauty salons have played in the life of Black communities has been highlighted in numerous books, documentaries, songs, and movies. As such, this project will allow students to develop an oral history video archive of Birmingham’s Black life and culture through the exploration of its Black churches, Black barbershops, and Black beauty salons. Throughout the course students will work in small groups to interview, survey, record, and video the everyday life, ideas, values and beliefs of Black people in at least TWO of each one of these Black cultural spaces. In order to do this work, some weekends might be necessary. In the end, students will collect, organize, and summarize the information that they gathered during the E-term course to create a formal presentation of their archival video and their findings during February’s Black History Month.

    Estimated Fees:               None
    Designations:                 Black Studies
  •  

    Business

    BA*299*13
    Business Internships
    Paul Cleveland

    Open To:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   Yes
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            TBD
    Class Hours:                           TBD
    Grading:                                 S/U

     

    The student will secure an internship with an organization for the month of January and enter into an agreement to work under the supervision of someone in the organization. The supervisor will enter into an agreement with the College that the work will be substantive and that agreement is made through the experiential learning office. The student will incorporate academics and experience to gain a better knowledge of a field of human endeavor. The student should find and read three articles and one book related to the field in which he/she works as an intern. The student’s supervisor may be helpful in identifying such readings. In addition, the student should keep a journal of daily activities. Based on these, a critical reflection is the integral component of experiential learning. Critical reflection is defined as the process by which individuals and groups make sense of experiences through inductive, deductive, and abductive reasoning. The DEAL (Describe, Examine, and Articulate Learning) model for critical reflection provides a shared strategy for aligning experiential learning projects with student learning outcomes. The critical reflection paper will be 8-10 pages and is for a grade of S/U

    Estimated Student Fees:        None
    Designations:                        Experiential Learning

     

  •  

    Chemistry

    CH*299*18
    Next Generation Nutritional Supplements 
    Scott C. Dorman
    Open to:                                All students who have completed CH 111
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         CH 111
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                           9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. MTWTh, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. F
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    An important area of science is bioinorganic chemistry. This field studies the role of metal ions in biology. Roughly speaking, metal ions that are critical for living organisms to function properly are called nutritional minerals. Animals must consume nutritional minerals through a proper diet and plants must have them available through uptake in the soil. Sometimes artificial mineral supplements for humans, animals, or plants can be developed to correct for any deficiencies in natural uptake. We will build on your CH 111 experience in synthesizing a possible mineral supplement to create a series of metal- amino acid compounds of your choosing. What important metals or amino acids can be combined to create potential mineral supplements? The empirical formula for each of your metal-amino acid compounds (mineral supplement) will be determined using the same procedures you learned in CH 111. This project is mainly lab based with each unique compound created counting as 2.5 points up to 75 points and the remaining 25 points from a formal paper.

    CH 111 is a required prerequisite for this course or instructor approval.


    Estimated Fees:             $150.00
    Designations:               None

     
  •  

    Chinese

    CHN*299*19
    An Exploration of Cultural Perspectives on Individual and Collective Rights during the Covid-19 Health Crisis in China
    Yan Tong
    Open to:                          All students
    Consent Required:             No
    Prerequisites:                   None
    Class Days:                      Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                     9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Grading:                          Letter Grade

     

    This new project examines the physical and mental health of Chinese people during the Covid-19 pandemic when the Chinese government implemented effective but aggressive measures to control the spread of the virus. Students will explore cultural differences between Chinese and US attitudes towards individual and collective rights, which in turn will arouse students’ cross-cultural awareness and encourage them to accept and respect diverse culture. This project will promote students’ resilience in the face of pandemic, raise their awareness of Covid-19 prevention, and foster some physical activities to reduce the negative impact of the pandemic outbreak on their health both physically and mentally. Using archives, survey, food, martial arts, movies, Chinese national sport, and calligraphy, this course examines the influence of Chinese government and Chinese philosophy to people, with a focus on gender, sacrifice, benevolence, integrity and cultural comparison. Besides reading assignments and in-class presentations, students will meet people from China online and do cross-cultural surveys. They will be required to analyze data collected from the survey and give a demonstration as well as presentation about the cultural perspective towards Covid-19 individually and collectively. Grades will be based on attendance, participation, reading assignments, quizzes and in-person presentation.

    Estimated fees:                $50.00
    Designations:                  None

     
  •  

    Education

    ED*299*20
    Explorations in Teaching in Elementary Schools
    STAFF
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                         MWF 9:00 am -12:00 pm ; TuTh 7:30 am -3:30                                                 pm
    Grading:                              Letter Grade

     

    This project is a field-based Exploration Term project that requires 42 hours of observation and teaching in classrooms at the elementary school level. Students will analyze assigned readings, observe, plan, and teach in schools, and reflect on their experiences in weekly reflection papers and a final presentation.

    Estimated Fees:               $170
    Designations:                 None

     


    ED *299* 21
    Explorations in Teaching in Middle and High Schools
    Louanne Jacobs 
    Open to:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                           8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    This is a field-based Exploration Term project that requires 80 hours
    of observation and participation in classrooms. The observations take place at the middle school and high school level. Students will analyze assigned readings, observe in schools, and articulate their experiences in the classroom in a reflection paper. Students must clear Alabama State Department of Education background check prior to placement.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   None

    ED *499*10
    Education Internship
    Gay Barnes

    Open To:                               Senior Education Majors
    Consent Required:                  Yes
    Prerequisites:                        Approval for student teaching internship
    Class Days:                           M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                          8:00 am - 3:00 pm in schools; Wed 3:30 - 5:00 pm on campus
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    This project is a capstone experience in clinical practice that involves full-time assignment to a collaborative classroom for four weeks under the join supervision of a certified teacher and college supervisor. Students design, plan, and implement coordinated learning experiences for children with exceptionalities, attend regular seminars, engage in independent conferences, and participate in the development of IEPs for children with disabilities.

    Estimated Student Fees:        None 
    Designations:                        None

     
  •  

    English

    EH*299*23
    Tolkien's Worlds: Language, History, Myth, Story
    Jody Stitt

    Open To:                                All students who have taken EH 102 or EH 208
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         EH 102 or EH 208
    Class Days:                            M Tu Th
    Class Hours:                           9:30 am - 12:30 pm
    Grading:                                 Letter Grade

     

    The course will focus on The Hobbit and (more so) The Lord of the Rings as well as shorter works such as “On Faerie-Stories.” Thematic elements will include Tolkien’s ideas about history, ethics, Christianity, myth, nature, industrialization, fate and free will, war and peace, modernism and antimodernism, social class, sub-creation, eucatastrophe, friendship, pity, and death. Stylistic elements will include interlacement, merging archaic diction with non-archaic diction and modern novelistic techniques, etymology as thematic cryptography, and approaching epic through an everyman or everyhobbit point of view. Tolkien’s philological work will be considered as an inspiration for Middle Earth, with language itself serving as protagonist. Secondary texts will include works by Tom Shippey as well as Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull. The course will require a substantial amount of reading. Evaluation will be based on one short essay (3-5 pages), one research paper (8+ pages), quizzes, and a final exam.

    Estimated Student Fees:            None
    Designations:                            None

     


     

    EH*299*56
    Reading and Writing Detective Fiction
    Michael McInturff
    Open to:                            All students 
    Consent Required:               No
    Prerequisites:                     None
    Class Days:                        M Tu Th
    Class Hours:                      10:00 am - 1:00 pm
    Grading:                            Letter Grade

     

    In this project, we will survey broadly a wide range of classic and contemporary detective fiction, all short stories. Each participant will produce completed drafts of two short stories in any of the modes of fiction we have encountered. One page response papers to the readings will be due twice a week. We will have regular outspoken but supportive workshops where writing progress and problems get shared.  Extensive out of class reading and writing will be required. Letter grade will be based on effort, responsiveness, participation, and quality of final stories submitted. The project should be especially helpful to aspiring authors/ creators.

    Estimated Student Fees:       None
    Designations:                       None
  •  

    General Studies

    GEN *299* 3
    ED *499* 4
    Education in Belize
    Amelia Spencer and Ann Dominick
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 Yes
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          On campus Jan 3-4, Travel Jan 5-26
    Grading:                              S/U for 299, Letter Grade for 499

     

    Travel to Belize to work alongside teachers in a local school. Students will teach English through multiple subjects and experience cultural immersion through service. Students will also experience the culture and natural resources of Belize through meetings with community leaders. The project will be facilitated by Toucan Education Programs. Students will prepare for the project by developing lesson plans and reading assigned articles. Students will be expected to participate fully in the school and group discussions, keep a reflective journal and submit a final reflective essay. Evaluation will be based on quality of preparation, participation, and the final essay.

    Estimated Fees:                 $5,500.00
    Designations:                    Experiential Learning
     
     

    GEN *299* 5
    The ABCs of European Capitals: Art, Business, and Culture of 5 European Cities (Madrid, Athens, Paris, Vienna, Brussels)
    Rick Lester and Treva Lester

    Open to:                         All students
    Consent Required:            Yes
    Prerequisites:                  None
    Class Days:                     On campus Jan 3-5, Travel Jan 6-27
    Grading:                         S/U

     

    Is there a geography-based understanding of world events? Does culture impact the world view? What role do commerce and culture play in national identity? To examine these questions, we will travel to five European cities. For 2024, we tentatively plan to visit MADRID, ATHENS, VIENNA, BRUSSELS, AND PARIS. We will visit some of the most important and exquisite museums of the world. In addition, we will contrast the old with the new by exploring the work of global commerce and media of these important world capitals. We will start with what we know here in Birmingham, where students will give reports on aspects of our itinerary. Then we travel for 21 days. Students will complete a group assignment before we leave and a reflective paper once returning.

    Estimated Fees:            $6,500.00
    Designation:                None

    GEN*299*25
    Changing Hobbies to Hustles: The Art of Stock Investments
    Sylvester Makoko
    Open to:                     All students
    Consent Required:        No
    Prerequisites:              None
    Class Days:                 M Tu Th 
    Class Hours:                9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                     Letter Grade

     

    This project is designed for students to develop skills needed to be active on the stock market, and the Crypto market. The goal is to familiarize the student with the entire stock investment process boosting the student’s confidence to participate in the stock market. Emphasis will be given to the public companies or crypto students are excited. We will identify opportunities and turn these hobbies into potential stock/crypto ownership. We will also explore these and other firms’ leadership, market share, bottom line, and trends to identify opportunities. The first two to three hours will be dedicated to discussing textbooks and external materials such as journal article readings. Students should commit a significant amount of time to the daily reading tasks, prepare for class discussions, and weekly reflections of covered materials. This project will culminate in a Stock Market/ crypto analysis paper discussing companies students believe present investment opportunities.


    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designation:                     None

    GEN*299*26
    Comic of Your Story
    Elena Masrour
    Open to:                            All students
    Consent Required:               No
    Prerequisites:                     AR 150 Drawing
    Class Days:                        M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                      10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Grading:                            Letter Grade

     

    This project will introduce you to the history of comic strips as an art form. Students will read about the history, concepts, storytelling, and character of comic strips, summarize them in an art project, then create their own comic strips. We will explore various aspects of comics from its inception to contemporary illustrations. The characters themselves can be based on yourself, where you portray yourself as either a hero or a villain or it can be an entirely imaginary character you created. The project will begin with research, gaining insights into how stories have been portrayed over the course of comics. It will then progress to ideations, writing as a short story and rounding itself out into final sketches that will then be created as a comic strip.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   None

    GEN *299* 27
    Civil War, Fascism, and the New Spain
    Eduardo Gregori
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          M W F
    Class Hours:                         10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                              Letter Grade

     

    In this project we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since dictator Francisco Franco’s death in 1975 and the onset of democracy. We will focus on the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: religion, sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decades. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplace when describing Spain and its people (and, by extension, of Latin America and Latinos in the US at large). It will be a socio-historical and cultural overview of contemporary Spain. We’ll explore cinema, literature, music, art, as well as political and social issues. We’ll meet 3 times per week, MWF, for 2 hours. However, class time will be focused on discussion and activities. Students will need to do their readings outside of class, as well as explore further on their own, following the teacher’s suggestions. No knowledge of Spanish is necessary, since the project will be entirely taught in English and all materials will be either in English or with English subtitles.

    Estimated Fees:                   None
    Designations:                     None

    GEN *299* 28
    Criminal Law - An Overview
    Jack Taylor
    Open to:                               All students
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        None
    Class Days:                           Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                          9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    This project provides an overview of criminal law. We will examine the sources of laws and the various types of crimes such as murder, robbery, and burglary. We will also explore the elements of crimes, their defenses, and their punishment. The U.S. Constitution, the Alabama Criminal Code, readings, actual cases, and two additional texts will be the primary resource material for the project. We will examine the U.S. Constitution as it applies to the court system, crimes, the rights of the accused, and criminal punishment. Guest speakers will be invited to discuss various topics. We will meet three days per week for three to four hours per day. Evaluation and grading will be based on class participation, outside assignments, and exams.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   None

    GEN*299*29
    Embroidery Fundamentals 
    Elaine Kinnard
    Open to:                            All students
    Consent Required:               No
    Prerequisites:                     None
    Class Days:                        M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                      10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                            Option

     

    This embroidery fundamentals project will examine the history and techniques of hand embroidery. This will be done through a series of readings, discussions, technical demonstrations, and hands on assignments followed by peer critiques that explore the structural and communicative aspects of embroidery, the relationship between matter, form, content and craftsmanship.

    After building a basic understanding of embroidery stitches and techniques you will use this visual vocabulary to create non- traditional embroidery compositions. Through the critical analysis of critique that follows, the project is evaluated for the success in communication using the visual library of embroidery.

    Estimated Fees:                $25
    Designations:                   None

    GEN*299*30
    Fantasy Football: A Case Study in Applied Data Analytics
    Walter Turner
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                         9:00 a.m.-11:50 a.m.
    Grading:                              Letter Grade

      

    Do you want to dominate your fantasy football league? Fantasy football has taken the sports world by storm and has brought abundance of television shows, websites, podcasts, and books devoted to giving fantasy players data and strategies to help them gain an edge over their fantasy league opponents. This project aims to utilize the wealth of available NFL and fantasy football data to teach data analytics research methods. After a survey of the history and gameplay of fantasy football, students will choose a research topic to be investigated using data analytics methods, write a supporting research paper, and produce a research presentation. Example research topics include: do wide receivers drafted in the first round of the NFL draft perform statistically better in fantasy football than those drafted in the second and third rounds, and do running backs allowed 6 weeks to rehabilitate a high ankle sprain score fewer fantasy points than those allowed to rehabilitate for the recommended 8-12 weeks?

    Estimated Fees:                  None
    Designations:                    None

    GEN*299*31
    How to Rest: Sabbath as Resistance and Renewal
    Kelsey Grissom
    Open to:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None 
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                           9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Option

     

    From Blue Laws to crop rotation, the Biblical command to rest has taken many forms in human society. This project will study the history of Sabbath-keeping and how contemporary Christians relate to and attempt to observe Sabbath. We will explore whether Sabbath-keeping has value as an act of resistance against today’s attention economy and cult of productivity (we’ll learn what those are, too!). This project requires outside reading, reflective writing, and a willingness to converse in class. No religious affiliation is required or expected, but students will be invited to explore various Sabbath practices of rest both academically and in their own lives.

    Estimated Fees:                   None
    Designations:                     None

    GEN *299* 32
    Internships in Community and Social Change
    Katy Smith
    Open to:                                 Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
    Consent Required:                    No
    Prerequisites:                          None
    Class Days:                             TBD
    Class Hours:                            TBD
    Grading:                                 Option

     

    Want to get out of the classroom and make a difference? Take advantage of this local internship opportunity that develops cultural competence, ethical leadership, and thoughtful community engagement. Students interested in exploring career paths and professional opportunities in community development, non-profit, educational, religious, interfaith, or other activist organizations should consider signing up for this project. Past organizations have included Birmingham Baha’i Center, Birmingham Islamic Center, Church of the Reconciler, Greater Birmingham Ministries, Planned Parenthood, Urban Ministry, and others! Students may also propose their own internship placements. Each organization will identify a project for the student to complete during the E-term. Grade will be based on a 8-10 page critical reflection paper, weekly participation in an online discussion forum, and the assessment of the sponsoring organization.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   Leadership Studies, Poverty Studies, Experiential Learning

    GEN*299*33
    Intersectional Exploration of Womanhood Embodiment
    Chénoia Bryant
    Open to:                                   All students
    Consent Required:                      No
    Prerequisites:                            None
    Class Days:                               Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                              1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                   S/U

     

    This project aims to not only examine the basic difference between sex and gender, but also why the notion of a monolithic version of womanhood being defined on the basis of anatomical difference and/or function is a harmful fallacy at best, but a way to diminish others’ humanity at worst. At its foundation, this project challenges the monolithic conceptualization of womanhood but also looks at how layered, varied and nuanced the experience of “woman” can be from an intersectional perspective. And most importantly, this project aims to be a call to reflection - to reflect upon your personal vantage point, voice, body, and where all those parts of you fit within this contemporary, evolving and ongoing conversation.

    Estimated Fees:                $450.00
    Designations:                  Gender and Women Studies, Experiential Learning

    GEN*299*34
    Introduction to Fresco and Scraffito
    Jurgen Tarrasch
    Open to:                               All students
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        None
    Class Days:                           M Tu W Th       
    Class Hours:                          10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    Introduction to Fresco and Sgraffito will introduce students to the ancient arts of the fresco and sgraffito. Students will learn about the materials needed and the various steps involved in the creation of frescos and sgraffitos, including the technique of preparing layers of plaster; the preparation of paints to be used, made by grinding individual pigments; the creation of preparatory drawings and how to translate these to the surface; how to apply the pigments to the wet plaster; and how to scratch the surface of the work to create a sgraffito. The project will teach students to work independently under the guidance of the instructor. Students will gain a better understanding of these ancient techniques and their implementation in contemporary art.

    Estimated Fees:                 $100.00
    Designations:                    None

    GEN*299*35
    January Wellness: Learning Ashtanga Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, Meditation, and Best Nutrition Practices
    Mary Harrison
    Open to:                               All students
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        None
    Class Days:                           Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                          11:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
    Grading:                               Option

     

    This project is about discovering the art of balance through Ashtanga and Vinyasa yoga, guiding you towards physical strength, flexibility, and inner peace. Learn the intricacies of each practice, mastering poses and sequences while aligning breath with movement. But it doesn’t stop there - delve into the profound benefits of meditation, cultivating mindfulness to reduce stress and enhance mental clarity. Explore the power of self- awareness as you learn to still the mind and find serenity amidst life’s challenges. Nourishing your body is equally vital, which is why we delve into the science of nutrition. Unravel the latest research on a diet that fuels your body, supporting your yoga and meditation practices, and promoting overall vitality.

    Estimated Fees:                    $185.00
    Designations:                       None

     

    GEN*299*36
    Music's Role in the Black Freedom Struggle in the United States from 1865 to 1965
    Open to:                                 All students
    Consent Required:                    No
    Prerequisites:                          None
    Class Days:                             M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                            12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.;some mornings required for field experiences and travel
    Grading:                                 Option

     

    The rich history of the black freedom struggle in the United States encompasses not only the abolishment of slavery and the Civil Rights Movement, but many more events throughout the 100-year struggle. This century is bookended by the Civil War in the nineteenth century and the Civil Rights Movement in the 20th century. Throughout this period, music had an indelible role through spirituals, protest songs, jazz, and concert music. This project will explore music’s role in the Black Freedom Struggle in the United States from 1865 to 1965. Students will visit and engage with source materials at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and Archives, the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and the Fame and Muscle Shoals Sound Studios in studying the overarching history of music’s role in this specific history. Students will also have the opportunity to research and present on a topic of interest surrounding the Black Freedom Struggle and the role of music. Grades will be based on class participation, short comprehension worksheets, brief reflections on field experiences, and a project poster presentation that students will share with their colleagues at the end of the term.

    Estimated Fees:                    $200.00 (admission to museums and trip to Muscle Shoals)
    Designations:                       Black Studies, Human Rights and Conflict Studies

    GEN*299*37
    Pre-Health Internship
    John Woods
    Open to:                                Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors on Pre-health track
    Consent Required:                   Yes
    Prerequisites:                         3.0 gpa, proof of current vaccinations and health ins
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                           TBD by preceptor
    Grading:                                 S/U

     

    This project allows students planning a career in health care to shadow physicians, dentists, or other health professionals through a 120 contact- hour internship. This internship is designed for students who are sophomores or above. A limited number of established internships are available at Birmingham area healthcare facilities, or students may set up their own internship with a private health care professional if approved by Dr. Woods.

    Estimated Fees:                  None
    Designations:                    None

    GEN*299*38
    Public Speaking and Social Advocacy
    Yingling Liu
    Open to:                           All students
    Consent Required:              No
    Prerequisites:                    None
    Class Days:                       Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                      9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    Grading:                           Letter grade

     

    Get over the fear of speaking in front of the public! Share life stories, learn communication skills, influence others and change the world. This project is designed to provide both a practical introduction to public speaking and a forum for practicing public speaking. The objectives are to familiarize you with some basic principles of effective, ethical public speaking, to give you practice enacting those principles, to instill a sense of the importance of public communication in shaping our lives, and to develop your awareness of the ethical obligations involved in social advocacy. You will have the opportunities to prepare for your capstone presentation, your next conference talk, your next professional interview, your social advocacy speech, or your next whatever speech you may deliver.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   Leadership Studies, Experiential Learning

    GEN*299*39
    Speculative Fiction Book Club, Film Salon, and Futurist Society
    Randy Cragun
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          M W F
    Class Hours:                         12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    Do you wonder how the world could be different or dream of seeing how people live in the distant future? What would racism look like in a world where other species of humans had not gone extinct? How would ideas about community be different if humans reproduced asexually? What if the police had not raided the Stonewall Inn that summer night in 1969? In the society, you will read, watch, and listen to stories about what could be and then discuss ideas in the stories with your classmates. This is not a literature or film class. The emphasis is on speculation, and stories are vehicles for that speculation. The instructor’s role will only be to provide structure and facilitate discussion. By registering, you are committing to coming to meetings prepared to contribute. Expect 9-10 hours of reading per week outside of meetings.

    Estimated Fees:                      None
    Designations:                        None

    GEN*299*40
    The Science of Cooking
    Duane Pontius
    Open to:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                           9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    Why is bacon so delicious? How does that fresh baked loaf of bread have the perfect combination of crunchiness and chewiness? The secret is often the science used to cook them. In this project, students will learn the science behind basic cooking techniques, and then use those techniques to cook a variety of delicious dishes. Cooking topics will include the Maillard reaction, crystal formation, acid base chemistry, mechanisms of heat transfer, and the science of cleaning up. 

    Food preservation techniques will include water bath canning, pressure canning, and food dehydration. We will also screen food related movies and documentaries to explore the social and cultural impact that food has on our lives. Students will be graded on weekly quizzes from textbook readings and class work as well as a final student-led cooking presentation. Lunch will be served most days.

    Estimated Fees:                       $200.00
    Designations:                          None

    GEN*299*54
    Fooling the Eye: The Art of Tromp L'oeil, Faux and Scenic Painting
    Matthew Mielke
    Open to:                                   All students
    Consent Required:                      No
    Prerequisites:                            None
    Class Days:                               M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                              1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                   S/U

     

    One of the most interesting forms of painting is Trompe L’oeil (“Fool the Eye”). It is the heart of scenic painting found in theatre, film, and television production. It is also found in opera, ballet, museum display, corporate events, church drama, cruise ship shows, theme parks, Las Vegas shows, civic murals, and in décor painting (using faux and trompe l’oeil techniques). We will learn and practice these painting techniques through several individual and team projects. Prior experience is not required. We will also have field trips to view murals and scenic art in the Birmingham community.

    Estimated Fees:                          None
    Designations:                            None
     

     
  •  

    Health Sciences

    HS *499*43
    Investigations into Human Biology and Health
    Centdrika Hurt and Sue Buckingham
    Open to:                                Seniors who have taken HC 203 and HC 242
    Consent Required:                   Yes
    Prerequisites:                         HS 203 and 242 (or equivalents)
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                           9:00 a.m- 12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                 Letter Grade

     

    Investigations into Human Biology and Health is the capstone experience for Health Science majors. This capstone will reinforce, at an advanced level, the concepts and skills presented in lower level courses by way of investigating a contemporary research problem in human biology and/or health care. Students will develop individual research projects conducting a systematic review of the primary literature to investigate questions of their interest related to human health. HS 499 will be an interdisciplinary experience, drawing from both natural and social science disciplines. Students will be evaluated on project development (in- depth annotations of primary scientific literature, hypothesis development, and research strategy), research progress (data collection and analysis), research paper reporting findings (formal scientific paper format; approximately 10-15 pages in length), and a 15-min oral presentation in preparation for senior conference. Overall, the course will emphasize interdisciplinary thinking, problem solving, analytical skills, and communication skills.

    Estimated Student Fees:        None
    Designations:                        None

     

     

  •  

    History

    HI*299*41
    Conspiracies and Secret Societies
    Elyssa Gage
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                         10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Grading:                              Option

     

    Freemasons, Templars, Jesuits, Illuminati, these are but a small sample of societies whose secrecy, or imagined secrecy, have served as the source of conspiracies and fascination in the modern era. This project will investigate the fears and fascinations surrounding these societies as vectors of social anxieties and values.

    Estimated Fees:                 None
    Designations:                   None

    HI*299*42
    The European Middle Ages in Film
    Johnathan Sapp
    Open to:                               All students
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        None
    Class Days:                           Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                          1:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    The European Middle Ages are a mainstay of Hollywood films, both as an historical setting and as a basis for fantasy world building. Films about the Middle Ages are (usually) not about educating the public about historical issues or people, but are attempts to rework past events to make claims in the present day. In this project, we will examine how the Middle Ages feature in popular culture, musical reconstruction, and imagery, with film as the central medium of discussion. Assessment of the final grade is based on four short (3-4 page) papers and class discussion based on readings. We will meet Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 1:00-3:30. Students must have access to media sources such as Netflix, Amazon Prime, or Hulu to view movies outside class. Many of the proposed movies are also available at the 365英国上市官网 Library.

    Estimated Fees:                    None
    Designations:                      None

     

  •  

    Mathematics

    MA*499*44
    Senior Project in Mathematics
    Doug Riley
    Open to:                                Senior Math majors
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         MA 470
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                           9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Letter Grade

     

    Students will focus on special topics in mathematics beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. Each student will choose a research project and submit a research proposal in writing prior to the end of the fall semester for approval by the instructor. Partner projects are permitted. The bulk of your time for this course will be independent work on your research project. Any approved research project will take a significant time commitment so you should be prepared to devote at least 40 hours per week to your research. Additionally, each student will meet with the instructor (at times to be arranged) and the class will meet together once per week (Wednesdays). Grades will be based on: progress presentations reported in class meetings; progress reported in individual meetings; paper drafts; final research paper; and Senior Conference final oral presentation.

    Estimated Fees:                        None
    Designations:                          None

     

  •  

    Media and Film Studies

    MFS *299* 58
    Sundance and Slamdance: Film Festivals and Independent American Film
    Nora Stone
    Open to:                         All students
    Consent Required:            No
    Prerequisites:                  None
    Class Days:                     Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                    12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    Grading:                         Letter Grade

     

    Explore indie film in American through screenings, readings, discussion, and short papers.  Students will study key films in the development of this unique art form and learn how changes in the media industries and American culture led to a robust alternative cinema.  After learning the history, students will attend the Sundance Film Festival and Slamdance Film Festival virtually.  They will watch official selections from the festivals, meet with filmmakers, and read coverage of the fests, to better understand contemporary indie film.

    Estimated Fees:             $60
    Designations:                None
  •  

    Music

    MU*499*46
    MU*299*46
    Children's Opera
    Jeff Kensmoe

    Open To:                              All students for 299; Seniors for 499
    Consent Required:                 Yes
    Prerequisites:                       Senior standing for 499
    Class Days:                          M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                         10:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
    Grading:                               Option for 299; Letter Grade for 499

     

    Students will learn, topically analyze, memorize, stage and perform 1 or 2 operas for the youth in our community: “Little Red Riding Hood,” “The Medium,” or “Signor Deluso.”  The class will travel throughout the Birmingham metropolitan area and perform for students of varying socio-economic backgrounds and ages.  The class will introduce opera and art to the youth of our community who may never have had the opportunity to experience such a life enhancing event.

    Estimated Fees:                     None
    Designations:                        None

    MU*299*47
    The Roots of Rock & Roll
    Lester Seigel
    Open to:                                All students
    Consent Required:                   No
    Prerequisites:                         None
    Class Days:                            M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                           1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                Option

     

    The roots of rock & roll begin with the African-American spiritual, developing through the blues, influenced by folk and country music into the high-energy, rhythmic style that caught fire in the 1950s among the Baby Boom after WW2, starting with Howlin’ Wolf, Elvis, through the British Invasion of the 1960s, and much more. Lots of listening, discussion, a wide variety of reading to tie in the music to social issues of the day, including racial tension, the Vietnam War, and the birth of the big business of music due to broadcasting, recordings, live concerts, the payola scandal, and more. Reflection papers will give you a chance to express yourself in writing, and daily discussion in class is essential. A daylong field trip is planned to Muscle Shoals’ two famous recording studios.

    Estimated Fees:                      $200.00 (trip to Muscle Shoals)
    Designations:                        None

     
  •  

    Political Science

    PS*299*49
    The Presidential Nominating System
    Steve Borrelli
    Open to:                               All students
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        None
    Class Days:                           Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                          6:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    The process for selecting a President traditionally begins with a set of old-fashioned meetings in one rural state, followed by elections in two or three other states, followed by a bewildering array of elections and meetings spread out over a three month period, punctuated by debates, commercials, and endless polls and pundits. Whose idea was this? How did it get this way? Is the system democratic? Does it encourage and select the best potential presidents? Does it need fixing? Students will research and discuss past presidential races, study and respond to what political scientists, legal experts, and campaign professionals have to say about the current system, and finish the term with a detailed essay offering their informed personal evaluation of the process and suggestions for reform.

    Estimated Fees:                      None
    Designations:                        Leadership Studies

     

  •  

    Pre-Law

    PL*299*48
    Pre-Law Internship
    Andrew Morgan
    Open to:                               Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
    Consent Required:                  Yes
    Prerequisites:                        3.3 GPA or Consent
    Class Days:                           M Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                          9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
    Grading:                               S/U

     

    The law office internship provides the pre-law student with the opportunity to observe and participate in the work of a law firm in the Birmingham area. It is intended for students who have minimal prior experience working in a law firm and want to learn more about the practice of law before making a decision to attend law school. In addition to working in a law firm, students are required to do extra readings and to write a series of reflection papers. Students will spend a minimum of 30 hours per week with their law firms and will meet three times during the month with the class and Dr. Morgan. Evaluation will be based on papers, participation, and the assessment of the sponsoring law firm.

    Note: Interested students must contact Dr. Morgan, the 365英国上市官网 pre-law advisor, before Friday, September 29th in order to be eligible for these internships. To apply, students will need to provide Dr. Morgan with a résumé, writing sample, and other specified information by this date.

    Estimated Fees:                  None
    Designations:                    None

     

  •  

    Psychology

    PY*499*50
    Research on an Advanced Topic in Psychology
    Lynne Trench
    Open to:                               Senior Psychology Majors
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        PY 221 and PY 222
    Class Days:                           Tu Th
    Class Hours:                          9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
    Grading:                               Letter Grade

     

    In this project students will explore an advanced topic in psychology. Possible topics include: Effects of Herbal supplements on behavior in rats, Effects of a Placebo on behavior of college students, Change blindness in humans. Throughout the project students will learn how to (1) choose an appropriate topic to review, (2) read journal articles effectively, (3) conduct a review of literature in a specific area, and (4) write a paper that demonstrates a mastery of this topic. The final product of this project will be a presentation and a paper that reviews the research related to a specific topic. The project grade will reflect the quality of this paper as well as attendance and participation at project meetings. It is required that Psychology majors who have taken PY 222 and who plan to take PY 472 in the spring term take this E-term project. The general purpose of this project is to learn how to research and review a specific, advanced topic in Psychology. The specific objectives of this project are to learn how to read a Psychology journal article effectively, choose a specific area of Psychology to review, conduct a review of literature in that specific area of Psychology, and write that information up into an APA style paper. Listed meeting times are just for interaction with the instructor and other students, but a substantial amount of time will be spent conducting research and writing outside of meetings. Additional meetings with the instructor will most likely be necessary as well.

    Estimated Fees:                  None
    Designations:                    None

    PY*299*51
    Planning Your Career in Psychology & Related Fields
    Jessica Allen & Greta Valenti
    Open to:                               Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
    Consent Required:                  No
    Prerequisites:                        PY 101
    Class Days:                           Tu W Th F
    Class Hours:                          9:30 a.m-12:30 p.m.
    Grading:                               S/U

     

    This project orients students interested in psychology and related fields to career opportunities at the Bachelor- and Graduate-level. The importance of professional skills-building will be emphasized, and students will have the opportunity to do experiential learning activities throughout the semester. Class time will consist of lectures, videos, and guest speakers and will focus heavily on leading and participating in class discussions and activities. Topics include job searching, interviewing, networking skills, and creating a professional development plan. Collaborations with the 365英国上市官网 Career Services are an important component of this project; both in and out-of-class time may include visits to Career Services and similar venues off-campus. Outside of class, students will create a “Professional Portfolio,” which will include drafts for graduate school and/or job application materials (e.g., cover letters, resumes/CVs, and personal statements). Students will also spend time out of class engaging in professional activities, including shadowing, interviewing alumni and professionals in psychology and related fields, and meeting with 365英国上市官网 professionals. This project includes heavy reading and discussion. Students will be graded on written and oral discussions of assigned readings, professional behavior, and on professional portfolio materials.

    Estimated Fees:                     $25.00
    Designations:                       None                               

    PY*299*52
    Sport and Excerise Psychology
    Richard Rector
    Open to:                                 All students
    Consent Required:                    No
    Prerequisites:                          None
    Class Days:                             Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                            10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
    Grading:                                  Letter Grade

     

    This project is designed to introduce the field of sport and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major themes in the area. We will explore such topics as personality, competition and cooperation, exercise and fitness, children’s development through sport, peak performance, burnout and overtraining, group dynamics, and leadership. Students will participate in relaxation techniques, visual imagery practices, and discussions about health and well- being. Students will be required to complete readings and view related media in and out of class. Evaluation will be based on participation, a five-page autobiography of how sports participation/exercise has affected their life, a five page summary discussing the psychology of sport and how it relates to an approved movie, a daily log chronicling their progress towards reaching specific exercise and sports related goals, and a group project.

    Estimated Fees:                      None
    Designations:                        None

     

  •  

    Theatre

    THA*299*53
    Hamilton: Representation, Then and Now
    Jennifer Luck
    Open to:                              All students
    Consent Required:                 No
    Prerequisites:                       None
    Class Days:                          M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                         1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
    Grading:                              Letter Grade

     

    Explore how telling the story of Alexander Hamilton through BIPOC bodies and voices alters the historical narrative. Discuss how “who lives, who dies, who tells your story” tackles issues of diverse representation, both on and off stage. “This is not a moment, it’s the movement” Evaluate conflicting critical perceptions and how the history being made today alters our response to even contemporary works.

    Estimated Fees:                  $200 (includes ticket to Hamilton: The Musical, travel and overnight stay in Atlanta)
    Designations:                     None

     

  •  

    Urban Environmental Studies

    UES*299*58
    Investigations of fish populations comparing coastal and montane habitats in the SE United States.
    Mark Meade
    Open to:                           All students
    Consent Required:              No
    Prerequisites:                    None
    Class Days:                       M Tu W Th
    Class Hours:                      9:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m.
    Grading:                            Letter Grade

     

    This course will expose students to techniques used by environmental scientists to assess the health of natural aquatic resources.  Students will be directly involved in research assessing fish populations using industry-standard protocols.  Students will determine stream assessment sites using historical and GPS data and will go on site to capture fish for identification (electrofishing) as well as collect water samples for laboratory DNA analysis.  Birmingham’s regional Valley and Village as well as AL/FL coastal creek systems will be surveyed.  Students will be graded based on specific assignments (1-mapping sites for survey, 2- attendance and participation in surveys, 3- organizing data and calculating Indices of Biotic Integrity, Shannon’s index, and other measures of ecological importance, 4-developing new maps of species occurrence, 5-developing a presentation/poster for a regional fisheries management science meeting such as the annual meeting of Alabama Chapter of American Fisheries Society. 

    Estimated Fees:                     None
    Designations:                        Experiential Learning